The Waste Pickers

Walking the streets of kathmandu you will see young men and women, as well as children, collecting up plastic and other recyclables - meet the Waste Pickers. These workers live on the edge scrapping together a living, many sleeping rough, through recycling.

Walking the streets of kathmandu you will see young men and women, as well as children, collecting up plastic and other recyclables – meet the Waste Pickers. These workers live on the edge scrapping together a living, many sleeping rough, through recycling. All images are copyright Neesha ( Alexandra) Bremner 2013.

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Waste pickers are at the bottom of the social rug in Nepal as they scrap together a fragile existence dealing with the rubbish of others for very little money. This troop of five boys and young men work a stretch of Lazimpat road clearing the streets of plastics and other recyclables.

For more information on the situation for waste pickers in Nepal please read Emilia Terzon’s Life at the Bottom article for  independent Australian publication New Matilda.

To support the ongoing work of The Storyteller Project – documenting the human stories of the developing world – please donate through the provided link on the left hand side of the page here. It is the intention of the The Storyteller Project,  with your support, to document this group of waste pickers further and to learn more about their situation.

Please note that all images are Copyright Neesha (Alexandra) Bremner 2013. Images cannot be used without the express written permission of The Storyteller Project.

I play where I was born

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Children are born into life on the streets and for some of them this is the only life they know. It is not a life full of hope but one of  violence, abuse, disease and malnutrition as a baseline of  their existence. The following images of a little girl were taken on the outskirts of Thamel, the tourist hub of Kathmandu. This girl, of around 18 months, ironically lives with her two brothers and mother outside a popular tourist attraction called the Garden of Dreams. The children all show signs of malnutrition. But regardless of this, this toddler still plays. Copyright Neesha ( Alexandra) Bremner 2013

Children are born into life on the streets and for some of them this is the only life they know.
It is not a life full of hope but one of violence, abuse, disease and malnutrition as a baseline of their existence.
The following images of a little girl were taken on the outskirts of Thamel, the tourist hub of Kathmandu.
This girl, of around 18 months, ironically lives with her two brothers and mother outside a popular tourist attraction called the Garden of Dreams. The children all show signs of malnutrition. But regardless of this, this toddler still plays.
Copyright Neesha ( Alexandra) Bremner 2013

Poverty and homelessness is an ongoing problem throughout Nepal.

In Kathmandu many live on the streets or in tenuous slum communities in order to survive. Figures from Homeless International indicate that out of Nepal’s 28 million citizens, 2.8 million live in slums, with 59 percent of urban populations living in slum communities. According to UNICEF there are an estimated 30,000 street children alone in Nepal, of which 3,700 are homeless.

In slum communities (which can be bulldozed down )  or for those living on the streets access to clean water, food and the fundamentals of a “good life”  is highly limited if not non-existent.  Living on the streets near tourist hubs gives access to income sources through begging and the ability to access foreigners wanting to “help” as well as being situated near the proliferation of NGO’s who assist street populations on an ad hoc or in a more systematic manner depending on the organisation, time of year, the political situation and the availability of funds.

Children are born into life on the streets and for some of them this is the only life they know.

It is not a life full of hope but one of  potential violence, abuse, disease and malnutrition as a baseline of  their existence.

The following images of a little girl were taken on the outskirts of Thamel, the tourist hub of Kathmandu.

This girl, of around 18 months, ironically lives with her two brothers and mother near a popular tourist attraction called the Garden of Dreams. The children all show signs of malnutrition. But regardless of this, this toddler still plays.

To support the ongoing work of The Storyteller Project – documenting the human stories of the developing world – please donate through the provided link on the left hand side of the page here. It is the intention of the The Storyteller Project,  with your support, to document this family further and to learn more about their situation.

Ranidevi Lower Secondary School

Ranidevi Lower Secondary School StudentsRanidevi Lower Secondary School StudentRanidevi Lower Secondary School StudentRandevi Lower Secondary School StudentRandevi Lower Secondary School - a disruption to classStudents at Ranidevi Lower Secondary School.

Earlier today I was privileged to spend time at Ranidevi Lower Secondary School, a government-funded school in Kathmandu. Head Teacher Ramjee Gautam is working to improve facilities at the 37-year-old school: from getting clean drinking water for the 300 plus students to sourcing second-hand computers from the United Kingdom so students can learn IT and computing fundamentals.

All images are Copyright Neesha (Alexandra) Bremner 2013.